Targeting Small Muscle Groups With Resistance Bands

Resistance bands are favoured by athletic trainers and fitness experts when it comes to conditioning small muscle groups. Smaller muscle groups are harder to train with traditional weights and exercise equipment, but resistance bands are flexible and manoeuvrable and therefore ideal for working on smaller muscle groups. Because they are flexible and work small muscles, resistance bands are often recommended by physical therapists to recover from surgery due to injury.

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Resistance bands are favoured by athletic trainers and fitness experts when it comes to conditioning small muscle groups. Smaller muscle groups are harder to train with traditional weights and exercise equipment, but resistance bands are flexible and manoeuvrable and therefore ideal for working on smaller muscle groups. Because they are flexible and work small muscles, resistance bands are often recommended by physical therapists to recover from surgery due to injury.

Don’t underestimate these seemingly lightweight pieces of rubber tubing. They can pack a punch. In fact resistance bands can give you an all over body workout that is every bit equal to a full gym workout if you know how to use them and the exercises in our book are designed to do exactly that. But be warned, this workout is no easy way out. If you do the whole programme, you will tone and strengthen every muscle group in your body.

Athletic coaches choose resistance bands for conditioning when they need athletes to replicate specific movements that they repeat over and over again in their sport. These repetitious movements involve the same muscles in the arms or legs, with varying degrees of intensity. As the intensity and direction in your throw, kick or punch changes subtlely, the smaller muscles are called into action, refining the effects of the larger muscles. Reproducing these movements with a resistance band can help to strengthen even the smallest muscles in the muscle group in a way that hand weights can’t accomplish. That’s why you might be given an exercise band say, to workout the small muscles in the hand or wrist following a broken arm, or the small muscles in the leg following knee surgery or another repair.

Training at home with resistance bands has other benefits. It complements a weights regime because it gives you a great cardiovascular workout, it can help you develop lean muscle and reduce fat, and it can help you improve coordination by refining the strength in even the smallest muscles in the body, resulting in better athletic ability overall, including improved balance and increased strength.

The minute you try a resistance band workout in the privacy of your own home you will know what we’re talking about. When you lift a dumbbell up and down you can feel yourself using the larger muscles right away. You can see the biceps bulge and feel the triceps working. When you pull on a resistance band,  it’s a very different feeling. Sure, it works the biceps and the triceps, but that wriggling little cord takes balance and coordination. You can literally feel the body calling into action the smaller muscles in your arm to help control the movement.  When you work out at home with resistance bands instead of weights, you will feel every bit as good as when you leave the gym. You will know you got a great workout because of the way it leaves you feeling. Tired for one thing – in a good way.  And every muscle will feel stretched, worked and toned.

Take your resistance bands with you when you leave home or when you can’t get to the gym, and rest assured that the workout you get is every bit as good as the one you left at the gym. These things work, and one session will be enough to prove that to you.